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February 2018

Yu Xie, Princeton

February 21, 2018 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4240 Public Affairs Building, 4240 Public Affairs Building
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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The California Center for Population Research and the Center for Social Statistics Presents: Heterogeneous Causal Effects: A Propensity Score Approach Heterogeneity is ubiquitous in social science.  Individuals differ not only in background characteristics, but also in how they respond to a particular treatment. In this presentation, Yu Xie argues that a useful approach to studying heterogeneous causal effects is through the use of the propensity score. He demonstrates the use of the propensity score approach in three scenarios: when ignorability…

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Per Block, ETH Zurich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich)

February 6, 2018 @ 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Franz Hall 2258A, Franz Hall 2258A

The UCLA Department of Statistics and the Center for Social Statistics presents: Modelling Mobility Tables as Weighted Networks Contemporary research on occupational mobility, i.e. how people move between jobs, tends to view mobility as being mostly determined by individual and occupational characteristics. These studies focus on people’s sex, ethnicity, age, education or class origin and how they get access to jobs of different wages, working conditions, desirability, skill profiles and job security. Consequently, observations in occupational mobility tables are understood…

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January 2018

Rob Warren, University of Minnesota

January 24, 2018 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4240 Public Affairs Building, 4240 Public Affairs Building
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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The California Center for Population Research and the Center for Social Statistics presents: When Should Researchers Use Inferential Statistics When Analyzing Data on Full Populations? Many researchers uncritically use inferential statistical procedures (e.g., hypothesis tests) when analyzing complete population data—a situation in which inference may seem unnecessary. We begin by reviewing and analyzing the most common rationales for employing inferential procedures when analyzing full population data. Two common rationales—having to do with handling missing data and generalizing results to other…

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December 2017

Nathaniel Osgood, University of Saskatchewan

December 12, 2017 @ 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
4240 Public Affairs Building, 4240 Public Affairs Building
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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The UCLA Department of Community Health Sciences and the Center for Social Statistics presents: Dynamic Modeling for Health in the Age of Big Data Traditional approaches to public health concerns have conferred great advances in the duration and quality of life. Public health interventions – from improved sanitation efforts, to vaccination campaigns, to contact tracing and environmental regulations – have helped reduce common risks to health throughout many areas of the world. Unfortunately, while traditional methods from the health sciences have…

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November 2017

Hadley Wickham, RStudio

November 8, 2017 @ 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm
1200 Rolfe Hall, 1200 Rolfe Hall

The UCLA Department of Statistics and the Center for Social Statistics presents: Programming data science with R & the tidyverse Tidy evaluation is a new framework for non-standard evaluation that will be used throughout tidyverse. In this talk, I'll introduce you to the problem that tidy eval solves, illustrated with examples of the various approaches used in R. I'll then explain the most important components so that you can start writing your own functions instead of copying and pasting tidyr…

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October 2017

Sander Greenland, UCLA Department of Epidemiology

October 24, 2017 @ 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
1434A Physics and Astronomy, 1434A Physics and Astronomy
Los Angeles, CA 90098 United States
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The UCLA Department of Statistics and the Center for Social Statistics presents: Statistical Significance and Discussion of the Challenges of Avoiding the Abuse of Statistical Methodology Sander Greenland will offer his perspective on the paper, “Redefine Statistical Significance”, which was the topic of the previous week’s seminar. Also he will discuss the challenges of avoiding the abuse of statistical methodology. Speaker: Sander Greenland, Professor Emeritus, UCLA Department of Epidemiology

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Daniel Benjamin, USC Dornsife Center for Economic and Social Research

October 17, 2017 @ 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
1434A Physics and Astronomy, 1434A Physics and Astronomy
Los Angeles, CA 90098 United States
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The UCLA Department of Statistics and the Center for Social Statistics presents: Redefine Statistical Significance Daniel Benjamin will discuss his paper (written by him and 71 other authors), “Redefine Statistical Significance”. The paper proposes that the default p-value threshold should be changed from 0.05 to 0.005. The paper is available at this link. Speaker: Daniel Benjamin, Associate Professor, USC Dornsife Center for Economic and Social Research  

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Workshop: Useful R 4 Stata Users Brown Bag

October 13, 2017 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Instructor: Michael Tzen, CCPR UCLA   Abstract: This workshop is a brown bag forum. Participants are encouraged to bring in tangible questions they wish to explore using R. To serve as a background road map, the instructor will provide an abbreviated sample of what he thinks are the most useful features of R. However, the goal is to have participants ask questions that the collective group can figure out using R. Any R question is fair game, for example: questions…

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June 2017

James Robins, Harvard University

June 9, 2017 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Room 33-105 CHS Building, 650 Charles E Young Drive South
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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The UCLA Departments of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, Statistics and the Center for Social Statistics presents: Causal Methods in Epidemiology: Where has it got us and what can we expect in the future? The principal focus of Dr. Robins’ research has been the development of analytic methods appropriate for drawing causal inferences from complex observational and randomized studies with time-varying exposures or treatments. The new methods are to a large extent based on the estimation of the parameters of a new class…

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Fragile Families Challenge: Getting Started Workshop

June 2, 2017 @ 12:00 pm - 4:00 pm
4240 Public Affairs Building, 4240 Public Affairs Building
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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Instructor: Ian Lundberg, Ph.D. Student, Sociology and Social Policy, Princeton University   Abstract: The Fragile Families Challenge is a scientific mass collaboration that combines predictive modeling, causal inference, and in-depth interviews in order to learn more about the lives of disadvantaged children. Fragile Families Challenge builds on the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study that has been running for about 20 years. The Fragile Families research team has been following about 5,000 families—collecting information about them and their environment at regular…

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